Can Framis Museum

Can Framis Museum - The Epic Guide

If contemporary architecture is what you’re after on your trip to Barcelona, then the place to be is the 22@ District in the Eastern part of Barcelona. This neighborhood used to be called ‘Poble Nou‘ (‘The New Village’) and was an area of heavy industry, at the heart of the textile industry of Barcelona and Spain in the 19th century. After becoming derelict at the end of the 20th century (as many industrial areas in other cosmopolitan cities), the government of Barcelona launched one of Europe’s most ambitious and largest urban renewal schemes for this area. They renamed the neighborhood “22@” (after the zoning code 22 for ‘heavy industry’) and invested heavily to turn this area into the center of innovation and IT in Barcelona (and by extension, Spain), with the aim of becoming Spain’s ‘Silicon Valley’ and being a catalyst for the economy.
The result after more than a decade of planning and building, is a fascinating neighborhood, with more than 1500 companies in communication, design and IT packed together with top-notch research labs and universities, in a combination of old factory buildings and new cutting edge buildings by world class architects.

The most famous of these new buildings, and basically a landmark for the whole Poblenou area, is the 144m high Torre Agbar (quickly nicknamed ‘the phallus building’ after its distinct shape…) by Jean Nouvel. If you take the L1 metro to the area, this tower will mark the entrance to the 22@ District (get of at ‘Glòries‘). From there, you’ll find a concentration of spectacular buildings by Carlos Ferrater (the Mediapro Tower), David Chipperfield (Diagonal 197) and Dominique Perrault (the 120m high Meliá Barcelona Sky, with its rooftop bar with panoramic views of the city), just to name a few.

But my personal favorite, is the Can Framis Museum, by architect Jordi Badia (from BAAS Arquitectura). This building complex houses the Barcelona outpost of the Fundació Vila Casas - a non-profit started in 1986 by pharmaceutical entrepreneur Antoni Vila Casas with the main goal of promoting contemporary Catalan art. The complex exists of two historical factory buildings (the name ‘Framis’ refers to the name of the textile factory which used to occupy the buildings) and a new concrete volume linking the existing buildings, and forming an enclosed courtyard in between. Here you’ll find the entrance to the museum, but people also use the space as a tranquil escape … From there, enjoy the beautiful play of contrast and textures on the buildings, juxtaposing the old brick buildings (which have been plastered completely white to turn them into abstract objects) with the new building by Jordi Baas, completely cast in rough concrete, with sharp cut openings and windows, dramatic cantilevers and fine detailing.
If, like me, you can appreciate some nearly brutalist concrete work, you can’t miss this building!

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Can Framis Museum

Tuesday – Saturday: 11:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday: 11:00am – 2:00pm

Carrer Roc Boronat, 116-126
Barcelona

+34 933 20 87 36